5 Things Great Bosses Regularly Tell Their Staff

by

Words have (huge) weight.

An empty office meeting room

Being a happy employee in today’s workforce comes down to a few core tenets: incentive, motivation and performance. And while wage is an important factor in one’s satisfaction, it’s been widely documented that monetary compensation isn’t the only incentive employees are looking for; it’s appreciation too. In a study of more than 3,000 employees conducted by Anna Nyberg at the Karolinska Institute, a strong link was found between leadership behaviour and heart disease in employees. Meaning stress-producing, negative bosses are literally bad for your heart.

Read More: This Method Is 34 Times More Successful In Getting A Response Than Email

Ever pondered what the best bosses might be telling their employees to keep them inspired and happy? We investigate the five things bosses should be telling their employees on a regular basis:

I have faith in you”

In an analysis of a decade’s worth of data, Gallup found that a strong connection fostered through trust allowed employees to feel they’re making a meaningful contribution to their company. This strong connection between employer and employee consistently led to positive outcomes for both individuals and the organisation, via higher productivity and increased profitability. While you may naturally give your employees tasks because you believe in their ability, affirming that verbally as you assign a new task will ensure a better outcome.

“Thank you, I appreciate your hard work.”

In a study conducted by Glassdoor, 80 per cent of employees said that they were motivated to work harder when their manager appreciated their work. So even if it’s one late night, extra effort on a last-minute pitch, or just a great attitude, a quick thank you can ensure your employee knows they are seen and valued for giving that little bit extra.

“How can I help?” 

Research reported by Deakin University revealed that supportive leadership was a key determinate in serving as a buffer against individual stress in the workplace. And let’s be honest, a high-strung environment prohibits productivity and general happiness. Ensuring your employees feel supported enough to perform their duties allows them to quit the nail-biting and channel that energy into productive work.

“If you ever need to talk, my door is open.” 

They say that “the art of communication is the language of leadership”, and rightly so. By communicating and facilitating an open-door policy, you are allowing space for early problems to be brought to your attention, and fixed, early on. An open dialogue directly ushers in a transparent environment, close working relationships, and fast access to important information.

“You’re doing a good job”

It’s no secret that a sincere form of positive affirmation can be a day-making act of kindness. And this is now backed up by science, with research suggesting that receiving a compliment has similar effects to that of receiving a cash reward. In this study, researchers found that the same area of the brain, the striatum, was activated when a person was rewarded with either a compliment or cash. So don’t be stingy with your words and let your praises sing loud!

Read More: 3 Workplace Red Flags That Are Telling You To Quit Your Job



Nicole Webb

Staff Writer Collective Hub

Nicole is a Sydney based writer, who’s previously written for Harper’s Bazaar and Elle Australia. She has mused about everything from the world of haute couture, the Sydney music scene and newly founded start-ups.

COMMENTS (0)
Niel

I can say through personal experience and practice this is great advice for everyone, not just leaders.

Reply
Niel

I have been applying this to every aspect of my life for the last few years. As a result my life and career are radically better for it. I have seen a couple of leaders that apply this, and mean it. It is inspires incredible loyalty and strong teams. This is unbelievably good advice.

Reply

We would love to hear your thoughts:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *