10 Netflix Docos to Bookmark for a Lazy Weekend

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Fluff your pillow – it's on.

Woman in bed nursing a cup of coffee
We’ve done the scrolling for you, siphoned out Real Life Wife Swap and Addicted to Sexting and found the top Netflix docos to get you thinking.

Iris (2014)
A gawk into the excessively accessorised world of 95-year-old Iris Apfel – a New York City stalwart as eccentric as she is iconic – comes care of famed documentary filmmaker Albert Maysle. This one will get fashionistas frothing at the mouth and many more inspired by Iris’s words of wisdom, pithily delivered from behind her signature oversized specs.

Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things (2015)
Could your life be lived better with less? Matt D’Avella puts forward a compelling counter-perspective to our consumer-driven culture by showcasing a melting pot of contented minimalists, exploring the trend that is stripping our homes and lives bare. Marie Kondo converts, hit play.

Searching for Sugar Man (2012)
Sixto Rodriguez disappeared after his first two albums bombed in the US but, unbeknownst to him, the ’70s rock-and-roller became something of a musical hero in Apartheid-era South Africa. Telling the tale of two devoted fans who made it their mission to track Rodriguez down, this Oscar-winning doco is as heart-warming as it is ear-pleasing.

Happy (2011)
If a penniless rickshaw puller smiles more than a cashed-up city slicker, then one has to wonder, what really makes us happy? Filmmaker Roko Belic does his best to find out, journeying from the swamps of Louisiana to the slums of Kolkata and interviewing leading scientists along the way.

Sunshine Superman (2014)
Not for the fainthearted, this doco lunges headlong into the story of Carl Boenish (AKA the founding father of base jumping), cleverly interweaving the leaping legend’s original footage with re-enactments and cutting-edge aerial photography. Keen to plunge further? Read our interview with director Marah Strauch.

Blackfish (2013)
Film can be a powerful tool for change, and this unblinking look at the death of a SeaWorld trainer by a captive killer whale set off an animal rights campaign and saw SeaWorld’s shares plummet. The controversial doco also scored a BAFTA nomination, and makes for a memorable watch.

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011)
“You must dedicate your life to mastering your skill,” says Jiro Ono, the 85-year-old owner of Tokyo’s tiny (but mighty famous) Sukiyabashi Jiro restaurant, whose life-long obsession is sushi. Much like its subject matter, Jiro’s story is a simple offering, executed with meticulous perfection. And never has raw fish looked so sumptuous.

What Happened, Miss Simone? (2015)
The high priestess of soul herself, Nina Simone is the titular star of this Netflix original that opened the 2015 Sundance Film Festival. It traces her decades-long career from singing through the graveyard shift at saloon bars to international stardom as a staunch civil rights activist, and will have you crooning long after the credits roll.

Maidentrip (2013)
What were you up to at 14 years of age? Dutch youngster Laura Dekker was setting out on a two-year voyage in pursuit of becoming the youngest person ever to sail around the world, having fought a ten-month court battle to be able to make that trip on her lonesome. Inspiring much? Oh yeah.

Read More: What Are Happy Women Doing Differently?

Renee Ballard

Thank you! I am always on the look out for another great Netflix doc to watch, so am happy for the recommendations, saves me getting 20 mins into a crap one where muscle heads tell me about their protein shakes – yawn!
HAGW 🙂

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