Why It Pays to Do One Thing Well

Australian designer Stanzee Treliving’s thriving fashion label is the perfect example


Since its conception in 2012, self-titled Australian label Stanzee has had a string of notable successes; with the A-List elite like Ruby Rose, Jennifer Hawkins and Mimie La Shirey donning its statement pieces regularly.

When so many in a fast-paced industry are substituting carefully considered creations for faster production turnovers, creator and designer Stanzee Treliving, is going back to her roots and focusing on quality and tradition.

Stanzee’s prowess with leather is no fluke: honing in on leather techniques, rather than casting too wide of a net in terms of creation worked to her advantage in the lead-up to the creation of her label. What some would consider a niche skill has become a signature of hers.

“When I studied at TAFE, I also did a leather course every Saturday and it focused on manipulating leather,” she tells Collective Hub. “It starts off as a raw hide and then you manipulate and create a design. The label really eventuated from this love of leather and manipulating it.”

While she’s learned to adapt her offerings to be more commercially viable, leather has proven to be the grounding and prestige of her label. She’s also been open to adapting and learning from anyone, including her customers, to make sure she’s on the right track.

“Know who your customer is, know who you want to be wearing your clothing and also don’t be afraid to ask for advice,” is her advice. “Ask people in the industry and get as much knowledge as you can.”

Here are Stanzee’s other tips for creating a stand-out label:

Stick to your gut.
“Ask for advice but always trust in yourself. It is so easy to get lost in what you think people want but you just have to believe in what you are doing.”

You’re never too big to network.
“It’s so important to meet with people in the industry and you can’t ever think that what you do is perfect, you can always improve. You are always wanting to build on the business and asking people who are specific to that area…different questions that you might not know and you might not be strong in is really important.

Don’t try to reinvent the wheel.
When I’m trying to find inspiration I like looking back at traditional techniques that are used in leather and other techniques that I respect…and then we are like ‘how can we use that…how is that going to inspire this?’”

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